fibre optic cable, multi-mode vs single-mode
duplex versus simplex, fiber patch cord

Fiber Optics: Multimode vs. Singlemode, Duplex vs. Simplex


Multimode
Multimode fiber optic cable has a large-diameter core that is much larger than the wavelength of light transmitted, and therefore has multiple pathways of light-several wavelengths of light are used in the fiber core.

Multimode fiber optic cable can be used for most general fiber applications. Use multimode fiber for bringing fiber to the desktop, for adding segments to your existing network, or in smaller applications such as alarm systems. Multimode cable comes with two different core sizes: 50 micron or 62.5 micron.

50- vs. 62.5-micron cable. Although 50-micron fiber features a smaller core, which is the light-carrying portion of the fiber, both 62.5- and 50-micron cable feature the same glass cladding diameter of 125 microns. You can use both in the same types of networks, although 50-micron cable is recommended for premise applications: backbone, horizontal, and intrabuilding connections, and should be considered especially for any new construction and installations. Both types can use either LED or laser light sources.

The main difference between 50-micron and 62.5-micron cable is in bandwidth-50-micron cable features three times the bandwidth of standard 62.5-micron cable, particularly at 850 nm. The 850-nm wavelength is becoming more important as lasers are being used more frequently as a light source.

Other differences are distance and speed. 50-micron cable provides longer link lengths and/or higher speeds in the 850-nm wavelength.

Fiber Type Bandwidth (minimum) at 850 nm at 1310 nm
50/125 µm 50 MHz/km 500 m 500 m
62.5/125 µm 160 MHz/km 220 m 500 m

Singlemode
Singlemode fiber optic cable has a small core and only one pathway of light. With only a single wavelength of light passing through its core, singlemode realigns the light toward the center of the core instead of simply bouncing it off the edge of the core as with multimode.

Singlemode is typically used in long-haul network connections spread out over extended areas--longer than a few miles. For example, telcos use it for connections between switching offices. Singlemode cable features a 9-micron glass core.

Duplex
Duplex cable consists of two fibers, usually in a zipcord (side-by-side) style. Use duplex multimode or singlemode fiber optic cable for applications that require simultaneous, bi-directional data transfer. Workstations, fiber switches and servers, fiber modems, and similar hardware require duplex cable. Duplex fiber is available in singlemode and multimode.

Simplex
Simplex fiber optic cable consists of a single fiber, and is used in applications that only require one-way data transfer. For instance, an interstate trucking scale that sends the weight of the truck to a monitoring station or an oil line monitor that sends data about oil flow to a central location. Simplex fiber is available in singlemode and multimode.
 
Simplex Singlemode 9-Micron Simplex Singlemode 9-micron Fiber Optic cable
Duplex Singlemode 9-Micron Duplex Singlemode 9-micron Fiber Optic cable
Simplex Multimode 50/62.5-Micron Simplex Multimode 50/62.5 Fiber Optic cable
Duplex Multimode 50/62.5-Micron Duplex Multimode 50/62.5 Fiber Optic cable
Simplex Right Angle Single-Multimode Simplex Single-Multimode Right Angle Fiber Optic cable
Duplex Right Angle Single-Multimode Duplex Single-Multimode Right Angle Fiber Optic cable
Fiber Optic Couplers Fiber Optic Couplers
Fiber Optic Inspection Microscope Fiber Optic Inspection Microscope
Fiber Optic Power & Loss Test Kit Fiber Optic Power & Loss Test Kit